Why Chinese Mothers are Superior

 

Why Chinese Mothers are Superior

The article “Why Chinese Mothers are Superior” brings forth an argument that Chinese parenthood seems superior in comparison to Western Parenthood. The author portrays the Chinese Mother as being strict in ensuring that their children accomplish any assigned task through comprehensive practice. On the other hand, the Western parents seem lenient and give their children the freedom to what do please them (Amy). The author has this view about the difference in parenthood among the Americans and Chinese because of the variance in behavior of the two upbringings. In comprehending the author’s point of view, the character displayed by the children coming from a different parenthood is attributable to their parents’ upbringing. It is agreeable that parents determine the character of an individual as the play a key role in shaping up an individual in his or her childhood.

The author is vocal in praising the Chinese way of parenthood whereby the punishment, ridicule and abuse is the order of the day. The kind of punishment that the Chinese children undergo appears harsh that deprives their right to fair treatment and love from their parents. The author ignores the fact that this kind of punishments could lead to fatal injuries and sometimes death in the name of correcting the child (Amy). There is a fault in his reasoning by thinking that strictness and severe punishments make the children learn desirable behaviors. In some instances, punishments lead children to being hard cores that do not learn anymore. It is evident from my own experience, that freedom is the best way to handle a child, when an individual has freedom to choose between good and bad, in most cases the conscious leads an individual to do the right thing. I advocate dialogue and reasoning other than punishment, as it makes me be resistant and feel like revenging (Amy).

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Works Cited

Chua, Amy. “Why Chinese Mothers Are Superior.” The Wall Street Journal Online The Saturday Essay (2011). Web. 7 Feb. 2015. <http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704111504576059713528698754.html>.