Cultural Anthropology: Sight Unseen Case Study

Cultural Anthropology: Sight Unseen Case Study

Cultural Anthropology: Sight Unseen Case Study

Paper details

For this Final Project, you will write an analysis paper that:
• demonstrates your ability to analyze an ethnographic case study for its cultural significance.
• demonstrates your ability to approach a case study analysis using a cultural relativist framework.
• demonstrates your ability to integrate into your analysis the different aspects of what comprises culture.
• demonstrates your ability to identify catalysts for cultural change.

As with your Practice Case Study, be mindful of what you’ve learned about cultural relativism and ethnocentricism as you work through your analysis. You can acknowledge your personal response to the issues raised in the film you choose, but be sure to take a step back, as anthropologists do, and use a culturally relativistic perspective.


Your success with this assignment will demonstrate your mastery of the following course outcomes:
o define and explain fundamental anthropological terms, concepts, and theories.
o demonstrate critical thinking skills.
o demonstrate communication skills.
After you choose one of the films provided, write a paper that analyzes the film and how it portrays a specific culture’s values, norms, and worldviews, how these have changed, and what have been the catalysts for this change.
Be sure to take into consideration the major themes in the course as you work through your analysis: Enculturation, Language and the Arts, Economies, Marriage/Family/Kinship/Descent, Political Systems, Religious Systems, and Globalization. Within these major themes, also keep in mind what key terms, theories, methods, and/or perspectives go into tying these themes to cultural anthropology. Each film may not address all of these themes, but you want to be sure to include any relevant themes into your analysis.
Unlike your Practice Case Study Analysis, this paper must include two outside credible sources, which you can search for using the Shapiro Library. Credible resources include scholarly articles, scholarly journals, essays published through a credible, peer-reviewed print or online source (such as National Geographic or any magazine, journal, or website affiliated with an anthropological association), published books (single author, multiple author, bound essay collections, or anthologies). While the primary focus of this paper is on your analysis of the film itself, you will include two credible sources (see source types above) that help you more clearly define a cultural practice or provide background on a specific culture or an aspect of that particular culture. For instance, if you were writing your paper on a film about livestock fairs in the U.S., you would look up sources on agricultural histories in the U.S. or FFA clubs or cultural studies on fairs in the U.S. These kinds of sources should not dominate your paper. Instead, they should help substantiate your analysis or provide credible background on a topic you are discussing.
Information on accessing the Shapiro Library is located in Blackboard, under Course Resources. For assistance and more information on using the library effectively, finding credible sources, and using paraphrases, quotations, and citations in your paper, please refer to Appendix: Finding and Using Credible Sources in your e-Learning Resource.

 

Be sure to review the Rubric for this assignment, which is provided later in this document, and to reach out to your instructor if you have any questions or concerns. A sample case study analysis paper is located in Module 2 of your e-Learning Resource.

Five Simple Steps to Accomplish the Critical Elements of Your Analysis
1. Watch the film, take notes, decide on which film you’d like to write, and gather your thoughts. As you watch the film, take notes on where and when you see specific aspects of culture, any of the major themes, and/or cultural change occurring.

2. Craft an introduction that gives your reader the WHAT and the WHY.
a) What are you analyzing? Use your introduction to describe the film and to help the reader understand how the film reveals key things about how the culture represented in the film sees themselves and how their culture is changing in specific ways. Be sure to clearly state what values, norms, and worldviews are represented in the film and what specific people or events have caused (or are continuing to cause) cultural change.
b) Why are you analyzing this film? Here is where you state the “agenda”, main idea, or reason you are analyzing the film, using relevant definitions and concepts from the course.. Use what you know about the key terms, concepts, theories, methods, perspectives, and themes tied to cultural anthropology in order to show you understand what culture “means” and what can change it.
c) Ask yourself the following kinds of questions: How does this specific culture see its own values, norms, and worldviews? What cultural changes happen in the film and why do they happen? What might be driving this change? How do the people who make up this culture feel about these changes?
3. Include a brief background.
In the body of your paper, provide the vital background information about relevant definitions and concepts needed to best understand how a culture defines itself and how cultural change can happen. This is also a good place to note your own perspective on the issues raised in the film. If you choose to do so, be sure to keep cultural relativism in mind.
This is also where you will integrate in two outside, credible sources. Be sure to include short, direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, as needed. BE SURE to review best practices on in-text citation in order to avoid plagiarizing a source. Review APA in-text/parenthetical citation and reference citation formats in the APA Appendix section of your e-Learning Resource.
4. Provide examples of cultural formation and cultural change.
a) Which examples of norms, values, and/or worldviews are represented in the film? What does the culture value? How do they express their values? Be sure to use specific examples from the film.
b) What cultural changes have occurred over time and what has caused those changes? What is the culture’s attitude toward these changes? Be sure to use specific examples from the film.

 

  1. Sign off with the significance of your analysis.
    Use your conclusion to revisit what you have illustrated throughout your paper about the significance of cultural values, norms, and worldviews and the function of cultural change. Transcript details, in case you cannot access the video:For this Final Project, you will write an analysis paper that:
    • demonstrates your ability to analyze an ethnographic case study for its cultural significance.
    • demonstrates your ability to approach a case study analysis using a cultural relativist framework.
    • demonstrates your ability to integrate into your analysis the different aspects of what comprises culture.
    • demonstrates your ability to identify catalysts for cultural change.

    As with your Practice Case Study, be mindful of what you’ve learned about cultural relativism and ethnocentricism as you work through your analysis. You can acknowledge your personal response to the issues raised in the film you choose, but be sure to take a step back, as anthropologists do, and use a culturally relativistic perspective.

    Your success with this assignment will demonstrate your mastery of the following course outcomes:
    o define and explain fundamental anthropological terms, concepts, and theories.
    o demonstrate critical thinking skills.
    o demonstrate communication skills.
    After you choose one of the three films provided, write a paper that analyzes the film and how it portrays a specific culture’s values, norms, and worldviews, how these have changed, and what have been the catalysts for this change.
    Be sure to take into consideration the major themes in the course as you work through your analysis: Enculturation, Language and the Arts, Economies, Marriage/Family/Kinship/Descent, Political Systems, Religious Systems, and Globalization. Within these major themes, also keep in mind what key terms, theories, methods, and/or perspectives go into tying these themes to cultural anthropology. Each film may not address all of these themes, but you want to be sure to include any relevant themes into your analysis.
    Unlike your Practice Case Study Analysis, this paper must include two outside credible sources, which you can search for using the Shapiro Library. Credible resources include scholarly articles, scholarly journals, essays published through a credible, peer-reviewed print or online source (such as National Geographic or any magazine, journal, or website affiliated with an anthropological association), published books (single author, multiple author, bound essay collections, or anthologies). While the primary focus of this paper is on your analysis of the film itself, you will include two credible sources (see source types above) that help you more clearly define a cultural practice or provide background on a specific culture or an aspect of that particular culture. For instance, if you were writing your paper on a film about livestock fairs in the U.S., you would look up sources on agricultural histories in the U.S. or FFA clubs or cultural studies on fairs in the U.S. These kinds of sources should not dominate your paper. Instead, they should help substantiate your analysis or provide credible background on a topic you are discussing.
    Information on accessing the Shapiro Library is located in Blackboard, under Course Resources. For assistance and more information on using the library effectively, finding credible sources, and using paraphrases, quotations, and citations in your paper, please refer to Appendix: Finding and Using Credible Sources in your e-Learning Resource.
    Be sure to review the Rubric for this assignment, which is provided later in this document, and to reach out to your instructor if you have any questions or concerns.
    Five Simple Steps to Accomplish the Critical Elements of Your Analysis
    1. Watch the film, take notes, decide on which film you’d like to write, and gather your thoughts. As you watch the film, take notes on where and when you see specific aspects of culture, any of the major themes, and/or cultural change occurring.

 

  1. Craft an introduction that gives your reader the WHAT and the WHY.
    a) What are you analyzing? Use your introduction to describe the film and to help the reader understand how the film reveals key things about how the culture represented in the film sees themselves and how their culture is changing in specific ways. Be sure to clearly state what values, norms, and worldviews are represented in the film and what specific people or events have caused (or are continuing to cause) cultural change.
    b) Why are you analyzing this film? Here is where you state the “agenda”, main idea, or reason you are analyzing the film, using relevant definitions and concepts from the course.. Use what you know about the key terms, concepts, theories, methods, perspectives, and themes tied to cultural anthropology in order to show you understand what culture “means” and what can change it.
    c) Ask yourself the following kinds of questions: How does this specific culture see its own values, norms, and worldviews? What cultural changes happen in the film and why do they happen? What might be driving this change? How do the people who make up this culture feel about these changes?
    3. Include a brief background.
    In the body of your paper, provide the vital background information about relevant definitions and concepts needed to best understand how a culture defines itself and how cultural change can happen. This is also a good place to note your own perspective on the issues raised in the film. If you choose to do so, be sure to keep cultural relativism in mind.
    This is also where you will integrate in two outside, credible sources. Be sure to include short, direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, as needed. BE SURE to review best practices on in-text citation in order to avoid plagiarizing a source. Review APA in-text/parenthetical citation and reference citation formats in the APA Appendix section of your e-Learning Resource.
    4. Provide examples of cultural formation and cultural change.
    a) Which examples of norms, values, and/or worldviews are represented in the film? What does the culture value? How do they express their values? Be sure to use specific examples from the film.
    b) What cultural changes have occurred over time and what has caused those changes? What is the culture’s attitude toward these changes? Be sure to use specific examples from the film.
    5. Sign off with the significance of your analysis.
    Use your conclusion to revisit what you have illustrated throughout. Here is a copy of the transcript in case you cannot get access to the video:For this Final Project, you will write an analysis paper that:
    • demonstrates your ability to analyze an ethnographic case study for its cultural significance.
    • demonstrates your ability to approach a case study analysis using a cultural relativist framework.
    • demonstrates your ability to integrate into your analysis the different aspects of what comprises culture.
    • demonstrates your ability to identify catalysts for cultural change.

    As with your Practice Case Study, be mindful of what you’ve learned about cultural relativism and ethnocentricism as you work through your analysis. You can acknowledge your personal response to the issues raised in the film you choose, but be sure to take a step back, as anthropologists do, and use a culturally relativistic perspective.

    Your success with this assignment will demonstrate your mastery of the following course outcomes:
    o define and explain fundamental anthropological terms, concepts, and theories.
    o demonstrate critical thinking skills.
    o demonstrate communication skills.
    After you choose one of the three films provided, write a paper that analyzes the film and how it portrays a specific culture’s values, norms, and worldviews, how these have changed, and what have been the catalysts for this change.
    Be sure to take into consideration the major themes in the course as you work through your analysis: Enculturation, Language and the Arts, Economies, Marriage/Family/Kinship/Descent, Political Systems, Religious Systems, and Globalization. Within these major themes, also keep in mind what key terms, theories, methods, and/or perspectives go into tying these themes to cultural anthropology. Each film may not address all of these themes, but you want to be sure to include any relevant themes into your analysis.
    Unlike your Practice Case Study Analysis, this paper must include two outside credible sources, which you can search for using the Shapiro Library. Credible resources include scholarly articles, scholarly journals, essays published through a credible, peer-reviewed print or online source (such as National Geographic or any magazine, journal, or website affiliated with an anthropological association), published books (single author, multiple author, bound essay collections, or anthologies). While the primary focus of this paper is on your analysis of the film itself, you will include two credible sources (see source types above) that help you more clearly define a cultural practice or provide background on a specific culture or an aspect of that particular culture. For instance, if you were writing your paper on a film about livestock fairs in the U.S., you would look up sources on agricultural histories in the U.S. or FFA clubs or cultural studies on fairs in the U.S. These kinds of sources should not dominate your paper. Instead, they should help substantiate your analysis or provide credible background on a topic you are discussing.

 

Information on accessing the Shapiro Library is located in Blackboard, under Course Resources. For assistance and more information on using the library effectively, finding credible sources, and using paraphrases, quotations, and citations in your paper, please refer to Appendix: Finding and Using Credible Sources in your e-Learning Resource.
Be sure to review the Rubric for this assignment, which is provided later in this document, and to reach out to your instructor if you have any questions or concerns. A sample case study analysis paper is located in Module 2 of your e-Learning Resource.

Five Simple Steps to Accomplish the Critical Elements of Your Analysis
1. Watch the film, take notes, decide on which film you’d like to write, and gather your thoughts. As you watch the film, take notes on where and when you see specific aspects of culture, any of the major themes, and/or cultural change occurring.

2. Craft an introduction that gives your reader the WHAT and the WHY.
a) What are you analyzing? Use your introduction to describe the film and to help the reader understand how the film reveals key things about how the culture represented in the film sees themselves and how their culture is changing in specific ways. Be sure to clearly state what values, norms, and worldviews are represented in the film and what specific people or events have caused (or are continuing to cause) cultural change.
b) Why are you analyzing this film? Here is where you state the “agenda”, main idea, or reason you are analyzing the film, using relevant definitions and concepts from the course.. Use what you know about the key terms, concepts, theories, methods, perspectives, and themes tied to cultural anthropology in order to show you understand what culture “means” and what can change it.
c) Ask yourself the following kinds of questions: How does this specific culture see its own values, norms, and worldviews? What cultural changes happen in the film and why do they happen? What might be driving this change? How do the people who make up this culture feel about these changes?
3. Include a brief background.
In the body of your paper, provide the vital background information about relevant definitions and concepts needed to best understand how a culture defines itself and how cultural change can happen. This is also a good place to note your own perspective on the issues raised in the film. If you choose to do so, be sure to keep cultural relativism in mind.
This is also where you will integrate in two outside, credible sources. Be sure to include short, direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, as needed. BE SURE to review best practices on in-text citation in order to avoid plagiarizing a source. Review APA in-text/parenthetical citation and reference citation formats in the APA Appendix section of your e-Learning Resource.
4. Provide examples of cultural formation and cultural change.
a) Which examples of norms, values, and/or worldviews are represented in the film? What does the culture value? How do they express their values? Be sure to use specific examples from the film.
b) What cultural changes have occurred over time and what has caused those changes? What is the culture’s attitude toward these changes? Be sure to use specific examples from the film.
5. Sign off with the significance of your analysis.
Use your conclusion to revisit what you have illustrated throughout your paper about the significance of cultural values, norms, and worldviews and the function of cultural change.
For this Final Project, you will write an analysis paper that:
• demonstrates your ability to analyze an ethnographic case study for its cultural significance.
• demonstrates your ability to approach a case study analysis using a cultural relativist framework.
• demonstrates your ability to integrate into your analysis the different aspects of what comprises culture.
• demonstrates your ability to identify catalysts for cultural change.

As with your Practice Case Study, be mindful of what you’ve learned about cultural relativism and ethnocentricism as you work through your analysis. You can acknowledge your personal response to the issues raised in the film you choose, but be sure to take a step back, as anthropologists do, and use a culturally relativistic perspective.

Your success with this assignment will demonstrate your mastery of the following course outcomes:
o define and explain fundamental anthropological terms, concepts, and theories.
o demonstrate critical thinking skills.
o demonstrate communication skills.
After you choose one of the three films provided, write a paper that analyzes the film and how it portrays a specific culture’s values, norms, and worldviews, how these have changed, and what have been the catalysts for this change.

 

Be sure to take into consideration the major themes in the course as you work through your analysis: Enculturation, Language and the Arts, Economies, Marriage/Family/Kinship/Descent, Political Systems, Religious Systems, and Globalization. Within these major themes, also keep in mind what key terms, theories, methods, and/or perspectives go into tying these themes to cultural anthropology. Each film may not address all of these themes, but you want to be sure to include any relevant themes into your analysis.
Unlike your Practice Case Study Analysis, this paper must include two outside credible sources, which you can search for using the Shapiro Library. Credible resources include scholarly articles, scholarly journals, essays published through a credible, peer-reviewed print or online source (such as National Geographic or any magazine, journal, or website affiliated with an anthropological association), published books (single author, multiple author, bound essay collections, or anthologies). While the primary focus of this paper is on your analysis of the film itself, you will include two credible sources (see source types above) that help you more clearly define a cultural practice or provide background on a specific culture or an aspect of that particular culture. For instance, if you were writing your paper on a film about livestock fairs in the U.S., you would look up sources on agricultural histories in the U.S. or FFA clubs or cultural studies on fairs in the U.S. These kinds of sources should not dominate your paper. Instead, they should help substantiate your analysis or provide credible background on a topic you are discussing.
Information on accessing the Shapiro Library is located in Blackboard, under Course Resources. For assistance and more information on using the library effectively, finding credible sources, and using paraphrases, quotations, and citations in your paper, please refer to Appendix: Finding and Using Credible Sources in your e-Learning Resource.
Be sure to review the Rubric for this assignment, which is provided later in this document, and to reach out to your instructor if you have any questions or concerns. A sample case study analysis paper is located in Module 2 of your e-Learning Resource.

Five Simple Steps to Accomplish the Critical Elements of Your Analysis
1. Watch the film, take notes, decide on which film you’d like to write, and gather your thoughts. As you watch the film, take notes on where and when you see specific aspects of culture, any of the major themes, and/or cultural change occurring.

2. Craft an introduction that gives your reader the WHAT and the WHY.
a) What are you analyzing? Use your introduction to describe the film and to help the reader understand how the film reveals key things about how the culture represented in the film sees themselves and how their culture is changing in specific ways. Be sure to clearly state what values, norms, and worldviews are represented in the film and what specific people or events have caused (or are continuing to cause) cultural change.
b) Why are you analyzing this film? Here is where you state the “agenda”, main idea, or reason you are analyzing the film, using relevant definitions and concepts from the course.. Use what you know about the key terms, concepts, theories, methods, perspectives, and themes tied to cultural anthropology in order to show you understand what culture “means” and what can change it.
c) Ask yourself the following kinds of questions: How does this specific culture see its own values, norms, and worldviews? What cultural changes happen in the film and why do they happen? What might be driving this change? How do the people who make up this culture feel about these changes?
3. Include a brief background.
In the body of your paper, provide the vital background information about relevant definitions and concepts needed to best understand how a culture defines itself and how cultural change can happen. This is also a good place to note your own perspective on the issues raised in the film. If you choose to do so, be sure to keep cultural relativism in mind.
This is also where you will integrate in two outside, credible sources. Be sure to include short, direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, as needed. BE SURE to review best practices on in-text citation in order to avoid plagiarizing a source. Review APA in-text/parenthetical citation and reference citation formats in the APA Appendix section of your e-Learning Resource.
4. Provide examples of cultural formation and cultural change.
a) Which examples of norms, values, and/or worldviews are represented in the film? What does the culture value? How do they express their values? Be sure to use specific examples from the film.
b) What cultural changes have occurred over time and what has caused those changes? What is the culture’s attitude toward these changes? Be sure to use specific examples from the film.
5. Sign off with the significance of your analysis.
Use your conclusion to revisit what you have illustrated throughout your paper about the significance of cultural values, norms, and worldviews and the function of cultural change.

For this Final Project, you will write an analysis paper that:
• demonstrates your ability to analyze an ethnographic case study for its cultural significance.
• demonstrates your ability to approach a case study analysis using a cultural relativist framework.
• demonstrates your ability to integrate into your analysis the different aspects of what comprises culture.
• demonstrates your ability to identify catalysts for cultural change.

 

As with your Practice Case Study, be mindful of what you’ve learned about cultural relativism and ethnocentricism as you work through your analysis. You can acknowledge your personal response to the issues raised in the film you choose, but be sure to take a step back, as anthropologists do, and use a culturally relativistic perspective.

Your success with this assignment will demonstrate your mastery of the following course outcomes:
o define and explain fundamental anthropological terms, concepts, and theories.
o demonstrate critical thinking skills.
o demonstrate communication skills.
After you choose one of the three films provided, write a paper that analyzes the film and how it portrays a specific culture’s values, norms, and worldviews, how these have changed, and what have been the catalysts for this change.
Be sure to take into consideration the major themes in the course as you work through your analysis: Enculturation, Language and the Arts, Economies, Marriage/Family/Kinship/Descent, Political Systems, Religious Systems, and Globalization. Within these major themes, also keep in mind what key terms, theories, methods, and/or perspectives go into tying these themes to cultural anthropology. Each film may not address all of these themes, but you want to be sure to include any relevant themes into your analysis.
Unlike your Practice Case Study Analysis, this paper must include two outside credible sources, which you can search for using the Shapiro Library. Credible resources include scholarly articles, scholarly journals, essays published through a credible, peer-reviewed print or online source (such as National Geographic or any magazine, journal, or website affiliated with an anthropological association), published books (single author, multiple author, bound essay collections, or anthologies). While the primary focus of this paper is on your analysis of the film itself, you will include two credible sources (see source types above) that help you more clearly define a cultural practice or provide background on a specific culture or an aspect of that particular culture. For instance, if you were writing your paper on a film about livestock fairs in the U.S., you would look up sources on agricultural histories in the U.S. or FFA clubs or cultural studies on fairs in the U.S. These kinds of sources should not dominate your paper. Instead, they should help substantiate your analysis or provide credible background on a topic you are discussing.
Information on accessing the Shapiro Library is located in Blackboard, under Course Resources. For assistance and more information on using the library effectively, finding credible sources, and using paraphrases, quotations, and citations in your paper, please refer to Appendix: Finding and Using Credible Sources in your e-Learning Resource.
Be sure to review the Rubric for this assignment, which is provided later in this document, and to reach out to your instructor if you have any questions or concerns. A sample case study analysis paper is located in Module 2 of your e-Learning Resource.

Five Simple Steps to Accomplish the Critical Elements of Your Analysis
1. Watch the film, take notes, decide on which film you’d like to write, and gather your thoughts. As you watch the film, take notes on where and when you see specific aspects of culture, any of the major themes, and/or cultural change occurring.

2. Craft an introduction that gives your reader the WHAT and the WHY.
a) What are you analyzing? Use your introduction to describe the film and to help the reader understand how the film reveals key things about how the culture represented in the film sees themselves and how their culture is changing in specific ways. Be sure to clearly state what values, norms, and worldviews are represented in the film and what specific people or events have caused (or are continuing to cause) cultural change.
b) Why are you analyzing this film? Here is where you state the “agenda”, main idea, or reason you are analyzing the film, using relevant definitions and concepts from the course.. Use what you know about the key terms, concepts, theories, methods, perspectives, and themes tied to cultural anthropology in order to show you understand what culture “means” and what can change it.
c) Ask yourself the following kinds of questions: How does this specific culture see its own values, norms, and worldviews? What cultural changes happen in the film and why do they happen? What might be driving this change? How do the people who make up this culture feel about these changes?
3. Include a brief background.
In the body of your paper, provide the vital background information about relevant definitions and concepts needed to best understand how a culture defines itself and how cultural change can happen. This is also a good place to note your own perspective on the issues raised in the film. If you choose to do so, be sure to keep cultural relativism in mind.
This is also where you will integrate in two outside, credible sources. Be sure to include short, direct quotations, paraphrases, and summaries, as needed. BE SURE to review best practices on in-text citation in order to avoid plagiarizing a source. Review APA in-text/parenthetical citation and reference citation formats in the APA Appendix section of your e-Learning Resource.
4. Provide examples of cultural formation and cultural change.
a) Which examples of norms, values, and/or worldviews are represented in the film? What does the culture value? How do they express